5.7.14 – Ilan Pappé and the foundation myth of Israel

In this week’s program, we’ll have a conversation with prominent Israeli scholar Ilan Pappé about his new book The Idea of Israel: A History of Power and Knowledge. In it, Pappe examines the way successive generations of Israeli historians have framed the 1948 conquest as a “liberation campaign,” and created a foundation myth that went unquestioned in Israeli society until the 1990s.

Mr. Pappe’s new book has been described as a powerful and urgent intervention in the war of ideas concerning the past, and the future, of the Israel and Palestine.

To continue to support this kind of programming, we need your help! VOMENA’s home station, KPFA 91.4FM, is in the midst of ap ledge drive. Call 510 848-5732 or toll free 1-800-439-5732 to donate, or contribute through our site, kpfa.org.

[Audio will be uploaded soon]

VOMENA 4.30.14 – A Lecture from Ali Abunimah: The Battle for Justice in Palestine

On today’s show, we’re broadcasting the lecture from Ali Abunimah on the failure of a two-state solution, which was given to benefit the Middle East Children’s Alliance. As Israel and its advocates lurch toward greater extremism, many ask where the struggle is headed. Abunimah offers a clear analysis of this crossroads moment and looks forward with urgency down the path to a more hopeful future.

Ali Abunimah is the author of One Country: A Bold Proposal to End the Israeli Palestinian Impasse and newly released The Battle for Justice in Palestine. He co-founded and directs the widely acclaimed publication The Electronic Intifada. Based in the United States, he has written hundreds of articles and been an active part of the movement for justice in Palestine for 20 years.
This lecture was originally given on April 22nd, 2014, and was sponsored by the Middle East Children’s Alliance and KPFA, the home of Voices of the Middle East and North Africa. To continue to support this kind of programming, we need your help! Call 510 848-5732 or toll free 1-800-439-5732 to donate, or contribute through our site, kpfa.org.

VOMENA 4-23-14: US-Iran relations and more

Last week, in accordance with a court document filed in New York, the Department of Justice agreed to distribute proceeds from the pending sale of an Iranian-owned 36-story skyscraper in Manhattan. Proceeds would go to the families of victims of various alleged attacks by Iran-backed militants in Lebanon, Saudi Arabia and Israel, among others.

In this week’s show, Shahram Aghamir speaks with Mansour Farhang, professor emeritus of international relations at Bennington College in Vermont, about current US-Iran relations as well as the US plan to sell the building housing owned by the Alavi Foundation and Assa Corporation.

The Alavi Foundation is a private not-for-profit organization devoted to the promotion and support of Islamic culture and Persian language, literature and civilization. Iranian foreign ministry spokeswoman Marzieh Afkham said on Saturday, “Confiscation of the properties of an independent charity organisation raises doubt about the credibility of US justice.”

The plan is the latest in a legal battle over the skyscraper, known as the Piaget Building, which was built in 1978 under the Shah of Iran. In a 2009 lawsuit, the Manhattan US attorney’s office claimed the Alavi Foundation was controlled by Iran. The court ruled that that Assa Corporation and Assa Company Limited, who own less then half of the building, were a front for Iran’s national Bank Melli. Last year, a federal court ruled that the skyscraper was subject to government forfeiture for “shielding and concealing Iranian assets” in violation of US sanctions law. According to The Guardian, Iran has called the seizure illegal and a violation of religious freedoms. So what is behind the recent dispute over the Alavi Foundation?

4.16.14 Personal Status Law in Iraq and Iran funding Iraqi Shia militias to fight in Syria

from Al Jazeera

On this week’s show, we look at the Iraqi cabinet’s approval for a new personal status legislation, called Ja’fari law, named after the sixth Shi’ite imam Ja’afar al-Sadiq. He established a school of jurisprudence (Shi’ite) in Madina in the 8th century. The draft law is now awaiting a final vote by the Iraqi Parliament, and has created an uproar among Iraqi women’s rights and civil rights community.

If approved, the Ja’fari law will abolish the current Personal Status Law No 188, which is considered one of the most progressive in the Arab world. The new law will roll back the right of women in marriage, divorce and child custody, as well as inheritance. It will lower the age of marriage for girls from 18 to 9 and for boys to 15.

In this week’s show, Malihe speaks with prominent Iraqi women Rights’s activist, Basma AlKhateeb, who volunteers with Iraq 1st CEDAW, Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women Shadow Report Coalition as expert and trainer. She spoke from Baghdad about who initially proposed the law and what the implications of this law are for Iraqi women.

Shahram Aghamir speaks with Martin Chulov, the Guardian’s Middle East correspondent, about one his recent reporting trips to the Iraqi city of Najaf. Iraqi Shia militias killed in Syria are the newcomers to the city’s cemetery, the biggest in the world. They discuss the growing political force Asa’ib Ahl al-Haq’s connections with Iran and thousands of Iraqi Shia militias funded by the Iranian government to fight on the side of Bashar Al Assad, who is predicted to win the next election in Syria.

Chulov writes, “The newest occupants of the cemetery were killed not here in Iraq but in Syria, where they fought under the green flag of the Middle East’s most potent new Shia Islamic political force, Asa’ib Ahl al-Haq (League of the Righteous).”

4.9.14 – “The Battle for Justice in Palestine” and MENA films at San Francisco International Film Fest

In this week’s show, Khalil Bendib speaks with Ali Abunimah, co-founder and director of website The Electronic Intifada about his new book, “The Battle for Justice in Palestine”. We’ll ask him about the movement for boycott, divestment, and sanctions against Israel and the future of Palestine.
Abunimah writes:
“Efforts to achieve a “two-state solution” have finally collapsed; the struggle for justice in Palestine is at a crossroads. As Israel and its advocates lurch toward greater extremism, many ask where the struggle is headed. This book offers a clear analysis of this crossroads moment and looks forward with urgency down the path to a more hopeful future.”
 Khalil speaks with Ali Abunimah about the main thesis of his book and the global BDS movement.

Later in the program, Malihe Razazan interviews Rachel Rosen, director of programming at the San Francisco International Film Festival about the annual festival, which will start on April 24th and it will run through May 5th. This year’s festival will feature 168 films, including 74 Narrative Features, 29 Documentaries, and a number of world and U.S. Premieres, including a number of films from the Middle East and North Africa.

Not featured in our show, but also of note: Jose State University Persian Studies is hosting for the first-ever “Cultures of the Iranian Diaspora”, a two-day conference featuring panels on visual arts, literature and film with Bay Area and nationally-acclaimed writers, artists and filmmakers.

The conference also features two special free events:

  • “Inja o Oonja: Stories from Iranian American Life” — a staged adaptation of three short stories from Tremors: New Fiction by Iranian American Writers on Friday, April 11. 7 pm, Le Petit Trianon Theatre, 72 N. 5th Street. Free and open to the public.
  • Filmmaking in the Diaspora– A Screening and Discussion Babak Sarrafan’s “Doosteh Hameshegy–Forever Friends” and Mo Gorjestani’s “Refuge” on Saturday, April 12. 7  pm, SJSU Student Union Ballroom. Free and open to the public.

For more information about the conference, visit: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/581896

 

4.2.14 – “Saudi Arabia’s Regional Ambitions and National Poetry Month”

On today’s show, we will explore Saudi Arabia’s regional ambitions in the Middle East and how US-Saudi relations are evolving.

Last week, amidst media reports of tension between the two countries, U.S. President Obama visited Saudi Arabia to meet with Saudi King Abdullah. Though Saudi Arabia has always been a staunch US ally, of late, foreign policy differences have arisen between the two countries. On this edition of VOMENA, we will explore Saudi Arabia’s regional ambitions in the Middle East and how US-Saudi relations are evolving. Shahram Aghamir interviews Toby Jones, a historian of the modern Middle East at Rutgers Univeristy. He is the author of Desert Kingdom: How Oil and Water Forged Modern Saudi Arabia.

April is National Poetry Month and this week we are bringing you some of the poetry of the Middle East’s most celebrated poet, Palestinian Mahmoud Darwish, translated by Iraqi poet Sinan Antoon, author of Baghdad Blues.

3.26.14 – “Tunisia’s New Constitution and Twitter Banned in Turkey”

Protesters hold placards reading “Do not touch my Twitter” during a protest against the Turkish government’s Twitter ban. [CNN]

Unlike its less fortunate neighbors to the east, since the fall of its long-time dictator Tunisia has so far managed to stay free of major violence and disorder. Host Khalil Bendib interviews Tunisian political scientist, Nadia Marzouki, a Jean Monnet Fellow at the European University Institute in Florence, Italy, about the recently passed Tunisian constitution.

Last week, Prime Minister Erdogan waged – as some have called it – a digital coup d’etat by banning the widely used social media network Twitter. On March 20th, during a campaign rally for the March 30th local elections, he said “We now have a court order. We’ll eradicate Twitter. I don’t care what the international community says. Everyone will witness the power of the Turkish Republic!”

On Thursday evening, Twitter users in Turkey were welcomed to their screens by the message “Twitter is blocked in Turkey by court order.” What was behind this daring move by the Turkish government and why has Prime Minister Erdogan decided to lash out primarily at Twitter? Host Malihe Razazan put these questions to Alexander Christie-Miller, a Turkey-based freelance journalist who writes for the Times of London and Christian Science Monitor.

A Turkish court just overturned the ban, and the government has 30 days to restore Twitter service to the country. Global news network, Vocativ, recently revealed that despite Erogdan’s dislike of the social media network, he has an “army” of fake accounts posting content supportive of the Prime Minister’s party and politics.

 

VOMENA 3.19.14 Why is the Dead Sea Dying and the 11th Anniversary of War in Iraq

Views of the Dead Sea in 1972, 1989, and 2011. NASA Earth Observatory / Wikipedia.

The famous Dead Sea, a salt lake between Jordan to the east and the occupied West Bank and present-day Israel to the west, has been shrinking at the alarming rate of 1.5 meters a year for the past 40 years. So why is the Dead Sea dying?

On this week’s show, Malihe Razazan talks to Palestinian environmentalist, Muna Dajani, about the Red Sea-Dead Sea Water Conveyance Project, a 10 billion dollar program attempting to revive the Dead Sea, sponsored by the World Bank. She says that 80% of the water from the Jordan River, which normally fills the Dead Sea, is being diverted by Israel for agricultural and domestic use.

The 110-mile pipeline, which will be laid on Jordanian territory, will pump 200 million cubic meters from the Red Sea, half of which will go towards the Dead Sea. The other half will be desalinated and sold by Israel to Jordan and Palestine.

However, the proposed plan is raising concerns among environmentalists – namely, how will mixing water from another sea affect the unique chemical and biological composition of the Dead Sea? The project would supply less than 100m of the 800m cubic meters of water needed each year to stabilize the Dead Sea – and doesn’t address the root causes of the declining water levels, according to Friends of the Earth Middle East.

Later in the program, we will mark the 11th anniversary of the war Iraq with Sinan Antoon reading from his book of poems, Baghdad Blues. He is an Iraqi poet, novelist, scholar, and an associate professor at the Gallatin School of Individualized Study, New York University and editor/cofounder at Jadaliyyah.

VOMENA 3.12.14 – “Palestinian soccer players under attack and social justice worker detained in Cairo”

The Palestinian national soccer team, a source of pride for many, has been under attack by the Israeli state. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill)

In our show this week, Khalil Bendib speaks with Dave Zirin, The Nation‘s sports editor, about the shooting of two teenage Palestinian soccer players by the Israeli occupation forces as well as a famous Palestinian soccer team in Chile, Club Deportivo Palestino, which also came under attack for printing the map of Palestine on their soccer jerseys.

On January 31st , two teenagers, Jawhar Nasser Jawhar, 19, and Adam Abd al-Raouf Halabiya, 17, were walking home from a training session when Israeli forces opened fire on them without a warning. They lived, but neither will ever be able to play their chosen sport again.
In a recent column in The Nation magazine, Zirin writes,
“Death, injury or imprisonment has been a reality for several members of the Palestinian national team over the last five years.”Just imagine if members of Spain’s top-flight World Cup team had been jailed, shot or killed by another country and imagine the international media outrage that would ensue.”
The recent shooting has intensified the campaign for FIFA to expel Israel from the football federation before the World Cup in Brazil in 90 days.
Further afield, in Santiago, Chile, another Palestinian soccer team has come under attack, but only rhetorically this time. The Club Deportivo Palestino is accused by Chilean Zionists of spreading hatred and even fomenting terrorism, by proudly wearing soccer jerseys depicting a map of historical Palestine. We discuss the significance of Club Deportivo Palestino.

Later in the program, Khalil interviews co-founder of the social justice group Code Pink, Medea Benjamin, who was beaten and detained upon arrival in Cairo. She was in transit to a Palestinian solidarity delegation and then to the Palestinian territory of Gaza for a women’s conference.

Listen to our show on SoundCloud, embedded below.

“Three years after the uprising in Yemen and Music Freedom Day”

Three years after the beginning of the Yemeni revolution, little has changed in the country, writes Alwazir [AFP/Getty Images]

February 11th marked the 3rd anniversary of the popular uprising in Yemen, which, after a long drawn-out process lasting almost a year, led to resignation of the long time dictator, Ali Abdullah Saleh. According to government’s own figures, more than 2000 unarmed protesters and military defectors, as well as more than 120 children and a total of 22,000 people were wounded over the year long protest.

In a recent piece on Aljazeera, Sanna-based activist and researcher Atiaf Zaid Alwazir writes that “While many positive steps have been taken in the past three years, including the official removal of former President Ali Abdullah Saleh from power, the creation of a transitional unity government, and the completion of the National Dialogue Conference (NDC), a complete break with the past is yet to be seen.” She also co-founded the media advocacy group #SupportYemen.

Our Shahram Aghamir speaks with Alwazir about the socio-political situation in Yemen. What has changed as a result of the historic uprising?

Later in the program, we will mark Music Freedom Day by featuring the prominent Iranian folk band, the Shanbezadeh Ensamble, led by Saeed Shanbehzadeh. The group originates from the southern city of Busher in Iran.

And the program ends with Sinan Antoon reading the poem “A Letter to Al-Mutanabbi Street,” excerpted from the book, “Al-Mutanabbi Street Starts Here”, a project of Beau Beausoleil and Sarah Bodma.

On March 5, 2007, a car bomb exploded on al-Mutanabbi Street in Baghdad, killing over 30 people and injuring more than 100. Al-Mutanabbi Street is the historic center of Baghdad bookselling, with bookstores, outdoor bookstalls, cafes, and stationery shops. The street has been the heart and soul of the Baghdad’s literary and intellectual community.
An exhibition of Al-Mutanabbi street is currently taking place at the San Francisco Center for the Book. More details can be found here.
Thanks for listening!

Get Adobe Flash playerPlugin by wpburn.com wordpress themes