Tag Archives: Iran Election

The Green Wave Documentary; Protests in Syria

In this week’s program, we discuss the wave of protests that has been shaking Syria since the middle of March.  Shahram Aghamir speaks with Bassam Haddad.  Bassam Haddad is Director of the Middle East Studies Program at George-Mason University and teaches in the Department of Public and International Affairs at George Mason University. He also serves on the Editorial Committee of Middle East Report and is Co-Founder of Jadaliyya Ezine.

The Green Wave, a documentary by Ali Samadi Ahadi.

The Green Wave, a documentary by Ali Samadi Ahadi.

Later in the program, Malihe Razazan will have a conversation with Ali Samadi Ahadi about his powerful documentary, The Green Wave, that narrates Iran’s 2009 post presidential election protests and the regime’s brutal crackdown.

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This Week: Israel Boycott; Tehran Art Exhibit in San Francisco

Wednesday, January 13, 2010

This week on Voices of the Middle East and North Africa, we’ll have a conversation with Ali Abu Nima, co-Founder of Electronic Intifada and activist and Middle East expert Jeff Blankfort, in which they each comment on an interview Voices of the Middle East and North Africa first taped and aired last month with Professor Noam Chomsky of MIT on the subject of the boycott, divestment and sanctions campaign as well as the role of Israeli lobby in influencing US foreign policy when it comes to Israel/Palestine. We invited Prof. Chomsky back for this debate, but he declined.

Click here to listen to the interview with Chomsky:

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Later in the program, Voices of the Middle East and North Africa producer Shuka Kalantari will talk to Bay Area-based artist Taraneh Hemami about an exhibit she has curated, titled ‘One Day: A Collective Narrative of Tehran‘, and which is currently showing at the Intersection for the Arts Gallery in San Francisco.

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This Week: Iran Political Crisis; Berber New Year

Wednesday, January 6, 2010

This week on Voices of the Middle East and North Africa, Shahram Aghamir will speak with Ali Rezaei a social researcher at the University of Calgary in Canada about the political crisis within the Iranian regime.

Later in the program, leading Bay Area based Algerian Berber musician and song writer Moh Alileche will talk to us about the Berber New year of 2960.

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This Week: Update on Iran Protest & Speech by Filmmaker Tariq Ali

Aired 12/29/09

Filmmaker Tariq Ali

This week, Voices of the Middle East and North Africa brings you an update about the protests in Iran, and on the governments continued wave of repression from Dr. Mansour Farhang, professor of politics at Benigton College. We also bring you the second part of a speech by noted  writer, journalist, and filmmaker Tariq Ali delivered at the Twelfth Annual Eqbal Ahmad Lecture at Hampshire College on November 17. His lecture was titled “Obama’s War in Afghanistan and Pakistan”. Finally, we have a poem by  Ahmad Shamlou, ready by Iraqi poet Sinan Antoon.

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On KALW’s Your Call Radio: What is the state of the Iran protests?

KALW’s Your Call with Sandip Roy

‘What is the state of the protest in Iran? On the next Your Call we will discuss this Saturday’s demonstration in support of the Iranian opposition at San Francisco City Hall – a demonstration that some groups on the left have decided to boycott.”

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Guests:
Shahram Aghamir in San Francisco
Bay Area based activist and producer of Voices of the Middle East and North Africa on KPFA

Kaveh Ehsani in Chicago
Assistant professor of International Studies at Depaul University and a member of the editorial boards of Middle East Report and the Tehran-based Goft-o-gu (Dialogue).

Reese Erlich in Oakland
Reese Erlich is a best-selling book author and Peabody-award winning journalist who writes regularly for the Dallas Morning News, Canadian Broadcasting Corp. Radio and National Public Radio. Erlich is co-author of Target Iraq: What the News Media Didn’t Tell You and his latest book Dateline Havana: The Real Story of US Policy and the Future of Cuba was published this year. Reese is just back from a trip to Iran.

Hadi Ghaemi in New York
Spokesperson for United 4 Iran, the organizers of Saturday’s rallies. The rally in San Francisco will be from noon to 4 p.m this weekend.

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Iran: a green wave for life and liberty

 

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Asef Bayat7 – 07 – 2009

The Tehran regime has used brute power to deter the insurgent tide of post-election protest. But the form of state it has created to defend itself from the people guarantees further convulsion, says Asef Bayat.

Tehran, June 2009

 

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Tehran, June 2009

Kaveh Ehsani, Arang Keshavarzian and Norma Claire Moruzzi

June 28, 2009

(Kaveh Ehsani is assistant professor of international studies at DePaul University. Arang Keshavarzian is associate professor of Middle East and Islamic studies at New York University. Both are editors of Middle East Report. Norma Claire Moruzzi is associate professor of political science and gender and women’s studies at the University of Illinois-Chicago.)

For background on Mousavi and his “green wave,” see Shiva Balaghi, “An Artist as President of the Islamic Republic of Iran?” Middle East Report Online, June 11, 2009.  

For more on privatization and the state of the Iranian economy under Ahmadinejad, see Kaveh Ehsani, “Survival Through Dispossession: Privatization of Public Goods in the Islamic Republic,” Middle East Report250 (Spring 2009).

For background on Ahmadinejad’s right populism, see Kaveh Ehsani, “The Populist Threat to Democracy,” Middle East Report 241 (Winter 2006).

For background on Ahmadinejad’s cultural rollback, see Azam Khatam, “The Islamic Republic’s Failed Quest for the Spotless City,” Middle East Report250 (Spring 2009).

See also Fatemeh Sadeghi, “Foot Soldiers of the Islamic Republic’s ‘Culture of Modesty,’” Middle East Report 250 (Spring 2009).

Order Middle East Report 250 online.

The morning after Ira

A Fledgling Movement: Women and the Iranian election

tajrish-5z-394a64Photo From Feminist School Website

Banner:” we vote for women’s demands”

 

 

 

 

The Mark News and Perspectives Daily

By Haideh Moghissi: Feminist theorist and author; Professor of sociology, York University.

First published May 28, 2009

Iranian voters will soon cast their

ballots for one of the four candidates who have passed the Guardianship Council’s ideological screening. Few people in Iran and even fewer outside believe that the election of a new president would bring meaningful changes to the Islamic regime’s policies. The country’s cleverly designed and forcefully safeguarded political system makes effective challenges from outside virtually impossible. The rule by intimidation and terror, the cancerous corruption of the ruling clerics and their clans, the widening gap between the rich and poor, and the horrifying signs of the profound despair of youth as reflected in growing drug addiction and prostitution, have dashed hopes for the possibility of the Islamic regime reforming itself. Why then has the pending presidential election renewed much excitement, generating debate and rejuvenating activism? While election campaigns always involve the exposure of previous misconduct, incompetency, and outright corruption within the regime, the public is of course not privy to these debates due to the absence of a free press and lack of government transparency. However, elections relieve the tension of day-to-day life in Iran by temporarily putting coercive apparatuses on (shorter) leashes. Also, the relative opening of the political space during elections energizes the opposition to show discontent and push for reforms. The remarkable mobilization of women and youth in the 1997 election of Mohamad Khatami was widely understood as a vote against the more conservative candidate, with a hope to halt Islamists’ further advances against women’s social and political rights. Eight years of Khatami’s inaction and conformist presidency, followed by four year of Ahmadinejad’s military-security-based administration, have more clearly shown the futility of hopes placed on any candidate from within the Islamic political and cultural system. This reality drove many Khatami enthusiasts into despair and admissions of defeat. Not the Iranian feminist activists though. In fact, this round of Iran’s pre-election politics is marked by the full-force entry of the Iranian women’s movement onto the political scene with a well-thought-out strategy that has mobilized many change-seeking individuals and groups within civil society. Without supporting any presidential candidate, Iranian women, under the banner of “women’s coalition movement” (jonbesh-e Hamgerai’i), have proclaimed two major demands: 1) Joining the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW); 2) A constitutional amendment to eliminate discriminatory articles that deprive women of equal rights with men. This ingenious strategy has so far drawn support from over 35 women’s and social justice groups and 600 activists and intellectuals, some of whom may not actually cast their votes in favour of any candidate. The campaign has forced all four candidates to spell out their views on the plight of women in Iran and what they would do to improve it. For instance, two candidates, Karrubi and Rezaee, have committed themselves to including a woman in their cabinet. Others have articulated their opposition to restrictions on women’s legal rights and public participation. Obviously, election promises are not to be taken too seriously, as the electorate in Iran, as elsewhere, knows only too well. While the intent of women’s entry into Iranian electoral politics is more modest, it has longer-term objectives. They do not ignore or deny the legitimizing impact of women’s participation in the elections, particularly at a time when the Islamic regime is increasingly losing its legitimacy. With much confidence and political maturity, they have expanded their consciousness-raising activities, reaching out to the broadest sections of the population, distributing thousands of pamphlets outlining why they have entered into electoral politics and their immediate and long-term goals. They want to seize the relatively free political space – which will only last until the elections are over – in order to publicize women’s demands, to strengthen contact with the general population, to rebuild relations, and create solidarity between women’s groups and other social justice and human rights activists. In other words, they have entered into election politics with a clear vision of what is possible to achieve and what is not, and are determined not to let go of what is possible because of what is not. Starting with their defiance against wearing the head scarf ordered by Khomeini only three weeks after the 1979 Revolution, Iranian women have remained at the forefront of the struggle for democracy and justice, exposing and pushing back the Islamists’ offensive inch by inch. But at no time has the political influence of women and women’s issues been so profoundly visible as at present.

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